DevRel – What is that?

Almost a year ago, I heard the term DevRel for the first time when Sara Safavi, from Planet, gave a talk at CodeOp and used that word to describe her new role. I knew Sara as a developer, like myself, so I was curious to learn what this role entailed and understand how it could attract someone with a strong technical background.

It turns out that DevRel – Developer Relations – is as close as you can be to the developer world, without actually writing code. All these things that I used to do in my spare time, like participating in hackathons, writing blog posts, participating in conversations on Twitter, speaking at events, are now the core part of my job. I did them, because they are fun, and also because I believe that ultimately, writing code has an impact in society, and in order to run that last mile we need to get out of our compilers and reach out to the world. Technology is like a piece of art – it only fulfills its mission when it leaves the artist’s basement and it reaches the museums, or at least the living room of someone who appreciates it.

I am happy to say that I am now the DevRel at the Open Geospatial Consortium. In a way, it is a bit ironic that I ended up taking this role in an organization that does not actually produce software as its main outcome. But in a way OGC is the ultimate software facilitator, by producing the standards that will be used by developers to build their interoperable, geospatial aware, products and services. If you are reading this and you are not a geogeek, you may think of W3C as a somehow similar organization: it produces the HTML specification, which is not itself a software, but how could we build all these frontend applications using React, Vue and so many other frameworks, without using HTML? It is that important. Now you may be thinking, “so tell me an OGC standard that I use, or at least know”, and, again, if you are not a geogeek, maybe you won’t know any of the standards I will mention. Even if you use, or have used at some point location data. And this is part of the reason why I am at OGC.

Location data is increasingly part of the mainstream. We all carry devices in our pockets that produce geo referenced data with an accuracy that was undreamed ten years ago. Getting hold of these data opens a world of possibilities for data scientists and data engineers, but in order for all these applications to be able to understand each other we need sound, well articulated standards in place. My main goal as DevRel at OGC will be to bring the OGC standards closer to the developer community, by making them easier to use, and by making sure that they are actually used. And maybe, just maybe, I will also get to write some code along the way.

Data Analytics Bootcamp

I have always dreamed about doing some contribution towards improving the gender balance in technology, which as you may know, is far from ideal.

Fortunately the opportunity arose, when Katrina Walker has invited me to teach the “Data Analytics”  bootcamp at CodeOp, an international code school for women and TGNC individuals.

Over the 6-month course, I will share my hands-on experience with the various stages of the data analysis pipeline, specifically on how to apply various technologies to ingest, model and visualize data insights.

Rather than focusing on a specific technology, I will leverage on the “best tool for the job, approach”, which is what I do when I want to analyse data. This means learning different tools, such as Python, R, SQL or QGIS, and often combine them together.

For me “data analytics” is like a journey, where we start with a high-level problem, translate it into data and algorithms, and finally extract a high-level idea. At the start and the end of journey, we should always be able to communicate with people that are not “data geeks” and this is one idea that I would like to pass in the course.

I will not add anything else, apart that I am really excited to get started!

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